Commemorations & awards

Scott and his men celebrate mid-winter dinner, 1911. Photo Herbert Ponting.

Scott’s mid-winter dinner

Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s 1910-1913 expedition is notable for its scientific achievements and the tragedy that befell the Polar Party. On 22 June 1911, Scott celebrated his last mid-winter dinner with his men. Little did he know that this dinner was to mark a tradition that continues to this day both at New Zealand’s scientific facility, Scott Base, and throughout New Zealand via the Society to honour those who spend winter on the Ice.

The conservation trophy

The conservation trophy, a miniature emperor penguin, is awarded by the Society to a person or organisation that has contributed significantly to any aspect of Antarctic or sub-Antarctic conservation. This includes the preservation of flora, fauna, historic buildings, sites and artefacts and the preservation of natural features of Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic area.

Previous recipients have included individuals who took part in New Zealand work parties to conserve the Ross Island historic huts, and staff members from Antarctica New Zealand and Antarctic Heritage Trust.  (See recipient list).

The trophy was carved by Christchurch sculptor Patrick Mulcahy in African walnut and donated to the Society in 1971 by Peter Voyce.

Recipients

1972 | J. Foster
1973 | L. Quartermain
1974 | B. Norris
1975 | E. Gibbs
1976 | P. Sagar
1977 | Project Jonah (NZ)
1978 | A. J. Black
1979 | Dr B. Stonehouse
1980 | Prof G. A. Knox
1981 | R. M. Conly
1983 | G. J. Wilson

1984 | M. W. Cawthorn
1985 | Dr L. G. Greenfield
1987 | D. Harrowfield
1991 | L. Goldsworthy
1994 | S. Miller
1995 | Antarctic Heritage Trust
1996 | TVNZ Natural History Unit
2004 | C. Cochran
2008 | P. Carey
2012 | Al Fastier
2014 | Neil Gilbert
2016 | Lizzie Meek

The Society's life members

The Society recognises with life membership to the Society, those people who excel in furthering the aims and objectives of the Society, or who have given outstanding service in Antarctica. They are elected by vote at the Society’s Annual General Meeting. The number of life members can be no more than 15 at any one time.

Meet our past and present life members.

Current life members

By location and the year elected:

Robin Ormerod, Wellington, 1996
Baden Norris, Canterbury, 2003
Randal Heke, Wellington, 2003
Arnold Heine, Wellington, 2006
Margaret Bradshaw, Canterbury, 2006

Ray Dibble, Wellington, 2008
Norman Hardie, Canterbury, 2008
Colin Monteath, Canterbury, 2014
John Parsloe, Canterbury, 2014
Graeme Claridge, Wellington, 2015
David Harrowfield, Canterbury, 2016
Robert Park, Canterbury, 2016
Alex McFerran, Canterbury, 2017

Access to our Antarctic magazine archive

First published in 1950 and still relevant today

Inspired by people’s interest in the Antarctic region, the Society’s flagship magazine, Antarctic, is available as an online searchable archive. Offering more than sixty years of news and stories, the archive contains a wealth of detail and commentary on New Zealand and other nations’ activities in the Antarctic region.

Sign up to the magazine archive View sample issue